Anger

By BIP

AngerBe angry, and do not sin.” Ephesians 4: 26

Anger can be useful, though it can also easily become a conduit for sin.

“Let every person be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to anger; for the wrath of man does not produce the righteousness of God.” James 1:20

So what should happen when we do get angry? After all, Jesus Himself got angry.

“So he made a whip out of cords, and drove all from the temple courts, both sheep and cattle; he scattered the coins of the money changers and overturned their tables.” John 2:15

The purpose of godly anger is to demonstrate and reveal  a wrong,  especially  when God’s commandments are not being followed.

“He said, ‘Get these out of here! How dare you turn My Father’s house into a marketplace!’” John 2:16

“You must not associate with anyone who claims to be a brother or sister but is sexually immoral or greedy, an idolater or slanderer, a drunkard or swindler. Do not even eat with such people… Expel the wicked person from among you.” 1 Corinthians 5:11,13

Anger shows our displeasure. When it’s acted upon in a godly way, the other party, if he has a heart for change, will feel convicted and will eventually repent; otherwise, he’ll audaciously display his own anger and be forever offended.

The same principle applies to parents as they discipline their children.

“Whoever spares the rod hates their children, but the one who loves their children is careful to discipline them.” Proverbs 13:24

A parent’s duty is to teach his children righteousness. When they disobey, he gets angry or disappointed, depending on the level of the offense. With many kids, whose parents did a proper job from the very beginning, there’s often no need to use the rod.

“Train up a child in the way he should go, And when he is old he will not depart from it.” Proverbs 22:6

Sometimes the gravity of an offense might challenge parents to take that further step, the rod. Still, it is not an opportunity to beat a small child senseless until he bleeds. A gentle spanking, with the right amount of sting, can usually do the trick and show the parents’ anger.

Spanking may or may not work with adolescents, since they’re almost adults. Therefore, adult techniques, which are usually laden with dialogue and stern discipline, should take precedence.

With complete strangers, anger should be kept under total control. It is not our job to correct them.

“Good sense makes one slow to anger, and it is his glory to overlook an offense.” Proverbs 19:11

“Anger lodges in the bosom of fools.” Ecclesiastes 7:9

When strangers are angry with us, this is the way to act:

“A soft answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger.” Proverbs 15:1

“A hot-tempered man stirs up strife, but he who is slow to anger quiets contention.” Proverbs 15:18

In family, anger should be quickly resolved.

“Do not let the sun go down on your anger, and give no opportunity to the devil.” Ephesians 4:27

In general, when anger is burning inside this is what is required:

“Be angry, and do not sin; ponder in your own hearts on your beds, and be silent.” Psalm 4:4

Then apply wisdom from above.

“The wisdom from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, open to reason, full of mercy and good fruits, impartial and sincere.” James 3:17

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